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Amos Jeannot

‒‒  Fonkoze stories  ‒‒

Tragedy of Amos Jeannot

On the afternoon of September 6, 2000, a group of 10 men dressed in official Haitian National Police uniforms came to the door of Fonkoze. Under the pretext of checking Fonkoze’s gun permits, they entered the building. The men forced all the employees on the floor at gunpoint and robbed the central safe. Before leaving, they asked by name for long-time Fonkoze employee, Amos Jeannot, and forced him into the back of their vehicle.

 

As the car drove away, Fonkoze employees painfully witnessed the men brutally beating him. Two days later, Fonkoze received a phone call. The caller said, “Tell Anne [Anne Hastings, Founding CEO of Fonkoze in Haiti] if she doesn’t close Fonkoze, we won’t let Amos go." It soon became evident that the attack was about more than money. It was about intimidating, or even destroying, the institution of Fonkoze. Even though the organization always kept a low profile, and quietly went about its work, someone was not happy with Fonkoze’s progress. Fonkoze USA and Fonkoze immediately broke with their low-profile status, and began to “make a loud noise.”

 

In Haiti, Anne and Leigh Carter [Fonkoze USA's Founding Executive Director] posted reward flyers in neighborhoods throughout Port-au-Prince and went to radio stations to broadcast Amos’ kidnapping. In the US, Fonkoze USA

organized an international campaign to pressure the Haitian government to fully investigate the attack and kidnapping. More than 1,000 faxes from all over the world were sent to the President of Haiti and the Chief of Police. In three popular Haitian newspapers, full-page ads ran calling for a full investigation, offering support and solidarity for Fonkoze, and signed by more than 100 international organizations. Sadly, though, the tortured body of Amos Jeannot was found in the Central Morgue by Fonkoze staff member Alexandre Hector three weeks later. Amos left behind a wife and a four-month-old son.

 

The National Cathedral in Port-au-Prince was filled to capacity with mourners at the memorial service as a banner flew in front proclaiming, “Thank you, Amos, for all your good work in the country, with the peasants, with the youth, and with the ti machann [rural market women].”

 

While the investigation stalled, Fonkoze continued its work to empower. When asked how Fonkoze staff could find the courage to do so, Anne replied, “Amos gave his life for Fonkoze; we have no choice but to keep moving forward.” With even more determination and solidarity from clients and supporters, Fonkoze did just that.

 

In his memory, we reflect on the sacrifices Amos and so many others have made throughout our 25-year history to help make Fonkoze’s work a reality today.

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Fonkoze USA
1718 Connecticut Ave NW, #201

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Copyright © 2020 Fonkoze USA.  All Rights Reserved.

With You, We Stand.

Show Your Support >>

for those who need it most.

On the afternoon of September 6, 2000, a group of 10 men dressed in official Haitian National Police uniforms came to the door of Fonkoze. Under the pretext of checking Fonkoze’s gun permits, they entered the building. The men forced all the employees on the floor at gunpoint and robbed the central safe. Before leaving, they asked by name for long-time Fonkoze employee, Amos Jeannot, and forced him into the back of their vehicle.

 

As the car drove away, Fonkoze employees painfully witnessed the men brutally beating him. Two days later, Fonkoze received a phone call. The caller said, “Tell Anne [Anne Hastings, Founding CEO of Fonkoze in Haiti] if she doesn’t close Fonkoze, we won’t let Amos go." It soon became evident that the attack was about more than money. It was about intimidating, or even destroying, the institution of Fonkoze. Even though the organization always kept a low profile, and quietly went about its work, someone was not happy with Fonkoze’s progress. Fonkoze USA and Fonkoze immediately broke with their low-profile status, and began to “make a loud noise.”

 

In Haiti, Anne and Leigh Carter [Fonkoze USA's Founding

Executive Director] posted reward flyers in neighborhoods throughout Port-au-Prince and went to radio stations to broadcast Amos’ kidnapping. In the US, Fonkoze USA organized an international campaign to pressure the Haitian government to fully investigate the attack and kidnapping. More than 1,000 faxes from all over the world were sent to the President of Haiti and the Chief of Police. In three popular Haitian newspapers, full-page ads ran calling for a full investigation, offering support and solidarity for Fonkoze, and signed by more than 100 international organizations. Sadly, though, the tortured body of Amos Jeannot was found in the Central Morgue by Fonkoze staff member Alexandre Hector three weeks later. Amos left behind a wife and a four-month-old son.

 

The National Cathedral in Port-au-Prince was filled to capacity with mourners at the memorial service as a banner flew in front proclaiming, “Thank you, Amos, for all your good work in the country, with the peasants, with the youth, and with the ti machann [rural market women].”

 

While the investigation stalled, Fonkoze continued its work to empower. When asked how Fonkoze staff could find the courage to do so, Anne replied, “Amos gave his life for Fonkoze; we have no choice but to keep moving forward.” With even more determination and solidarity from clients and supporters, Fonkoze did just that.

 

In his memory, we reflect on the sacrifices Amos and so many others have made throughout our 25-year history to help make Fonkoze’s work a reality today.

Stay Connected.

Sign up below to receive stories of inspiration, news updates and more!

Donate Today

Get Updates

Learn More

STAY CONNECTED TO FONKOZE

Fonkoze USA
1718 Connecticut Ave NW, #201

Washington, DC 20009

Copyright © 2020 Fonkoze USA.  All Rights Reserved.

With You, We Stand.

Amos Jeannot

‒‒  fonkoze stories  ‒‒

On the afternoon of September 6, 2000, a group of 10 men dressed in official Haitian National Police uniforms came to the door of Fonkoze. Under the pretext of checking Fonkoze’s gun permits, they entered the building. The men forced all the employees on the floor at gunpoint and robbed the central safe. Before leaving, they asked by name for long-time Fonkoze employee, Amos Jeannot, and forced him into the back of their vehicle.

 

As the car drove away, Fonkoze employees painfully witnessed the men brutally beating him. Two days later, Fonkoze received a phone call. The caller said, “Tell Anne [Anne Hastings, Founding CEO of Fonkoze in Haiti]

if she doesn’t close Fonkoze, we won’t let Amos go." It soon became evident that the attack was about more than money. It was about intimidating, or even destroying, the institution of Fonkoze. Even though the organization always kept a low profile, and quietly went about its work, someone was not happy with Fonkoze’s progress. Fonkoze USA and Fonkoze immediately broke with their low-profile status, and began to “make a loud noise.”

 

In Haiti, Anne and Leigh Carter [Fonkoze USA's Founding Executive Director] posted reward flyers in neighborhoods throughout Port-au-Prince and went to radio stations to broadcast Amos’ kidnapping. In the US, Fonkoze USA organized an international campaign to pressure the Haitian government to fully investigate the attack and kidnapping. More than 1,000 faxes from all over the world were sent to the President of Haiti and the Chief of Police. In three popular Haitian newspapers, full-page ads ran calling for a full investigation, offering support and solidarity for Fonkoze, and signed by more than 100 international organizations. Sadly, though, the tortured body of Amos Jeannot was found in the Central Morgue by Fonkoze staff member Alexandre Hector three weeks later. Amos left behind a wife and a four-month-old son.

 

The National Cathedral in Port-au-Prince was filled to capacity with mourners at the memorial service as a banner flew in front proclaiming, “Thank you, Amos, for all your good work in the country, with the peasants, with the youth, and with the ti machann [rural market women].”

 

While the investigation stalled, Fonkoze continued its work to empower. When asked how Fonkoze staff could find the courage to do so, Anne replied, “Amos gave his life for Fonkoze; we have no choice but to keep moving forward.” With even more determination and solidarity from clients and supporters, Fonkoze did just that.

 

In his memory, we reflect on the sacrifices Amos and so many others have made throughout our 25-year history to help make Fonkoze’s work a reality today.

Stay Connected.

Sign up below to receive stories of inspiration, news updates and more!

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Copyright © 2020 Fonkoze USA.  All Rights Reserved.

Amos Jeannot

‒‒  fonkoze stories  ‒‒

On the afternoon of September 6, 2000, a group of 10 men dressed in official Haitian National Police uniforms came to the door of Fonkoze. Under the pretext of checking Fonkoze’s gun permits, they entered the building. The men forced all the employees on the floor at gunpoint and robbed the central safe. Before leaving, they asked by name for long-time Fonkoze employee, Amos Jeannot, and forced him into the back of their vehicle.  As the

Tragedy of Amos Jeannot

car drove away, Fonkoze employees painfully witnessed the men brutally beating him. Two days later, Fonkoze received a phone call. The caller said, “Tell Anne [Anne Hastings, Founding CEO of Fonkoze in Haiti] if she doesn’t close Fonkoze, we won’t let Amos go." It soon became evident that the attack was about more than money. It was about intimidating, or even destroying, the institution of Fonkoze. Even though the organization always kept a low profile, and quietly went about its work, someone was not happy with Fonkoze’s progress. Fonkoze USA and Fonkoze immediately broke with their low-profile status, and began to “make a loud noise.”

 

In Haiti, Anne and Leigh Carter [Fonkoze USA's Founding Executive Director] posted reward flyers in neighborhoods throughout Port-au-Prince and went to radio stations to broadcast Amos’ kidnapping. In the US, Fonkoze USA organized an international campaign to pressure the Haitian government to fully investigate the attack and kidnapping. More than 1,000 faxes from all over the world were sent to the President of Haiti and the Chief of Police. In three popular Haitian newspapers, full-page ads ran calling for a full investigation, offering support and solidarity for Fonkoze, and signed by more than 100 international organizations. Sadly, though, the tortured body of Amos Jeannot was found in the Central Morgue by Fonkoze staff member Alexandre Hector three weeks later. Amos left behind a wife and a four-month-old son.

 

The National Cathedral in Port-au-Prince was filled to capacity with mourners at the memorial service as a banner flew in front proclaiming, “Thank you, Amos, for all your good work in the country, with the peasants, with the youth, and with the ti machann [rural market women].”

 

While the investigation stalled, Fonkoze continued its work to empower. When asked how Fonkoze staff could find the courage to do so, Anne replied, “Amos gave his life for Fonkoze; we have no choice but to keep moving forward.” With even more determination and solidarity from clients and supporters, Fonkoze did just that.

 

In his memory, we reflect on the sacrifices Amos and so many others have made throughout our 25-year history to help make Fonkoze’s work a reality today.

Stay Connected.

Sign up below to receive stories of inspiration, news updates and more!

Donate Today

Get Updates

Learn More

STAY CONNECTED TO FONKOZE

Fonkoze USA
1718 Connecticut Ave NW, #201

Washington, DC 20009

Copyright © 2020 Fonkoze USA.  All Rights Reserved.