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Summary Report - November 2019

CLM: Sustainable Impact

‒‒  research summary  ‒‒

Fonkoze’s Chemen Lavi Miyò (CLM) program has succeeded consistently at helping families take the first steps out of extreme poverty. More than 7000 families have participated in the 18-month program since it was piloted starting in 2007, and over 96% of the families who complete the program have met or exceeded its simple graduation criteria, which include the following:

 

  • They are eating hot meals every day,
  • They have at least two forms of income and a proven ability to increase what they have,
  • They have a good tin roof over their heads, and
  • They have a plan for the future and the confidence to know they can succeed.

 

But what happens to the families after graduation? Do they sustain the improvements they’ve made in their lives? A study of the program by England’s Institute of Development Studies attempted to answer these questions. The study was financed with support from the Swiss Embassy in Haiti. It looked at data from 550 participants, both from when they entered and when they graduated from the program. For 353 of those program participants, it included surveys done four years after they graduated. Researchers did an additional survey a year later for 160 participants, and at that time 60 in-depth interviews were undertaken as well.

Results of the study were both encouraging and instructive. 72% of the women interviewed had either sustained their improvements or made further progress five years after graduating. But the analysis also pointed to ways that the CLM team could do more to help members build sustainable success. Analysis pointed to the importance of increasing the emphasis on strategies designed to help families withstand the economic and other shocks they are likely to face. To read the full report on the study, go here.

 

The program is now working in three areas in particular:

 

  • A more wide-ranging approach to teaching families to plan for the future,
  • Increasing the emphasis on teaching the importance of having diverse savings strategies, and
  • Encouraging families to diversify their productive assets.

 

For more information about the Fonkoze-IDS research program on CLM, visit www.ids.ac.uk/projects/haitian-graduation-research/

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With You, We Stand.

Show Your Support >>

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CLM: Sustainable Impact

‒‒  research summary  ‒‒

Fonkoze’s Chemen Lavi Miyò (CLM) program has succeeded consistently at helping families take the first steps out of extreme poverty. More than 7000 families have participated in the 18-month program since it was piloted starting in 2007, and over 96% of the families who complete the program have met or exceeded its simple graduation criteria, which include the following:

 

  • They are eating hot meals every day,
  • They have at least two forms of income and a proven ability to increase what they have,
  • They have a good tin roof over their heads, and
  • They have a plan for the future and the confidence to know they can succeed.

 

But what happens to the families after graduation? Do they sustain the improvements they’ve made in their lives? A study of the program by England’s Institute of Development Studies attempted to answer these questions. The study was financed with support from the Swiss Embassy in Haiti. It looked at data from 550 participants, both from when they entered and when they graduated from the program. For 353 of those

program participants, it included surveys done four years after they graduated. Researchers did an additional survey a year later for 160 participants, and at that time 60 in-depth interviews were undertaken as well.

 

Results of the study were both encouraging and instructive. 72% of the women interviewed had either sustained their improvements or made further progress five years after graduating. But the analysis also pointed to ways that the CLM team could do more to help members build sustainable success. Analysis pointed to the importance of increasing the emphasis on strategies designed to help families withstand the economic and other shocks they are likely to face. The program is now working in three areas in particular:

 

  • A more wide-ranging approach to teaching families to plan for the future,
  • Increasing the emphasis on teaching the importance of having diverse savings strategies, and
  • Encouraging families to diversify their productive assets.

 

To read the full report on the study, go here.

 

For more information about the Fonkoze-IDS research program on CLM, visit www.ids.ac.uk/projects/haitian-graduation-research/

Sign up below to receive stories of inspiration, news updates and more!

Donate Today

Get Updates

Learn More

STAY CONNECTED TO FONKOZE

Fonkoze USA
1718 Connecticut Ave NW, #201

Washington, DC 20009

Copyright © 2020 Fonkoze.  All Rights Reserved.

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CLM: Sustainable Impact

‒‒  research summary  ‒‒

Fonkoze’s Chemen Lavi Miyò (CLM) program has succeeded consistently at helping families take the first steps out of extreme poverty. More than 7000 families have participated in the 18-month program since it was piloted starting in 2007, and over 96% of the families who complete the program have met or exceeded its simple graduation criteria, which include the following:

 

  • They are eating hot meals every day,
  • They have at least two forms of income and a proven ability to increase what they have,
  • They have a good tin roof over their heads, and
  • They have a plan for the future and the confidence to know they can succeed.

 

But what happens to the families after graduation? Do they sustain the improvements they’ve made in their lives? A study of the program by England’s Institute of Development Studies attempted to answer these questions. The study was financed with support from the Swiss Embassy in Haiti. It looked at data from 550 participants, both from when they entered and when they graduated from the program. For 353 of those program participants, it included surveys done four years after they graduated. Researchers did an additional survey a year later for 160 participants, and at that time 60 in-depth interviews were undertaken as well.

 

Results of the study were both encouraging and instructive. 72% of the women interviewed had either sustained their improvements or made further progress five years after graduating. But the analysis also pointed to ways that the CLM team could do more to help members build sustainable success. Analysis pointed to the importance of increasing the emphasis on strategies designed to help families withstand the economic and other shocks they are likely to face.

 

To read the full report on the study, go here.

 

The program is now working in three areas in particular:

 

  • A more wide-ranging approach to teaching families to plan for the future,
  • Increasing the emphasis on teaching the importance of having diverse savings strategies, and
  • Encouraging families to diversify their productive assets.

 

For more information about the Fonkoze-IDS research program on CLM, visit www.ids.ac.uk/projects/haitian-graduation-research/

Sign up below to receive stories of inspiration, news updates and more!

Donate Today

Get Updates

Learn More

STAY CONNECTED TO FONKOZE

Copyright © 2020 Fonkoze.  All Rights Reserved.

Donate Today

Get Updates

Learn More

STAY CONNECTED TO FONKOZE

Fonkoze USA
1718 Connecticut Ave NW, #201

Washington, DC 20009

Copyright © 2020 Fonkoze.  All Rights Reserved.

CLM: Sustainable Impact

‒‒  research summary  ‒‒

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